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petawawarace
March 18th, 2015, 11:46pm
Just curious how many of you guys heel/toe downshift at lapping days?? I don't need to with the racecar because the engine spins up fast enough and doesn't upset the car too much except into 2nd gear.

Gonna bring the new BMW out to a couple evening sessions this year and I've been practicing heel/toe. I can tell the BMW has alot more engine braking and Ill likely need to heel/toe.

mphysk
March 18th, 2015, 11:52pm
I don't. Not smart enough. And toes too big.

Go for a ride with James (wing). He good

dbg
March 18th, 2015, 11:56pm
Do all the time with the C6. It's pretty easy to heel-and-toe. Don't want to be shocking the transmission and differential.

A couple of years ago I blew my S2000's differential. I think hard autocross launches were the main factor (had previously blown my diff mounts at autocross), but I wasn't heel-toeing all the time it because the pedal position made it hard. C6 is easy to heel-toe so I have religion on it.

1Morelap
March 19th, 2015, 03:33am
I struggled trying to do that with the ball of my foot on the brake pedal and couldn't reach properly. Works better with my 'toe' on the brake pedal and just lean the side of the foot onto the gas.

tellum
March 19th, 2015, 06:46am
I've always done it how Greg explains it. Not so much in my automatic, but hey it rev matches for me on downshift.

SpidermanGeek
March 19th, 2015, 06:48am
I never quite understood the technique... And I've never done lapping, so no point really.

I'll just stick to double-clutching like I should. It really helps prevent Danger to Manifold.

RandomHer0
March 19th, 2015, 07:10am
I struggled trying to do that with the ball of my foot on the brake pedal and couldn't reach properly. Works better with my 'toe' on the brake pedal and just lean the side of the foot onto the gas.

This.

When I was struggling to make more time, forced myself to learn it, made me smoother and faster. Ended up being more of a foot roll.

pyxen
March 19th, 2015, 07:18am
I do...side-of-foot style.

Works when I'm not thinking about it...when that starts, all manner of things could happen!

Pete
March 19th, 2015, 07:22am
I don't. Not smart enough. And toes too big.

Go for a ride with James (wing). He good


I've always done it how Greg explains it. Not so much in my automatic, but hey it rev matches for me on downshift.

Also did it like Greg explained. Having good shoes made this even easier.

If I could do it in a Miata with my size 12, anyone should be able to. My BRZ was so easy, pedals were very nicely placed for this stock

29384

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 07:24am
I struggled trying to do that with the ball of my foot on the brake pedal and couldn't reach properly. Works better with my 'toe' on the brake pedal and just lean the side of the foot onto the gas.

I agree. The technique should be the same, but pedal locations make it easier one way or the other.
Heres some fancy footwork...
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7DhtCbSayj0

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 07:27am
I always heel/toe, even on the street.

If the wheels are not locking up if you downshift without it, you are not using the brakes to their full potential.

karmaboy
March 19th, 2015, 07:38am
I use the Greg technique. Modified the pedal in the Miata to make it work, the Mini is just about perfect as is.

I still can't left foot brake effectively. It's what separates the fast kids from the mid-pack in Formula Vee.

Mario
March 19th, 2015, 07:53am
I have too, my clutch is so brutal, it almost locks the diff when downshifting. To train, I've force myself to match every gear when I daily drive. I've installed a custom gas pedal on my cars so I can grab the gas pedal with the side of the foot. It's more like rolling the foot. Now it's a habit and don't think about it, I just do it all the time

yanrider
March 19th, 2015, 08:02am
Yep I use my ankle for throttle. All depends on the car's pedal positions right. For my situation it's too easy, I've brought passengers for ride doing reg matching etc, and when they saw me get out of the car in Flip Flops they were like WTF, actually easier!

SpidermanGeek
March 19th, 2015, 08:14am
Lol.. I've tried heel/toe, but my feet just aren't coordinated. I'm overthinking it too.

People just think I don't know how to drive stick when I try it. I press too hard on all pedals like a dumb ape. Wheels chrip/lock-up while engine revs to redline, lol. It's not pretty. Or I'll grind the gear because I let out the clutch before I've actually shifted. I dunno.. I just said fuck this, I'll stick to reading comic books, lol.

I'll lap when I get a car with flappy paddles, lol.

Andre
March 19th, 2015, 08:16am
I use the Greg technique.I think I've heard it refered to as Toe/Toe? ...and yes same, both Mini and Z06 I couldn't figure out how to place foot for heel/toe so did foot-rolly toe/toe thing

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 08:17am
Nobody is perfect when first starting. This is why you really should not do it if only trying to do it on track. You are just going to make a mess of your driving. Practice, practice, practice.

Mario
March 19th, 2015, 08:17am
I even heel & toe when I drive gran turismo and it works with the game

what Mighty said. It's super difficult at first

Andre
March 19th, 2015, 08:18am
ya FWIW I do it instinctively whenever driving manual now.. Sort of strange, became a habit

SpidermanGeek
March 19th, 2015, 08:19am
I even heel & toe when I drive gran turismo and it works with the game

what Mighty said. It's super difficult at first

Damn you G25/G27 users!

wing
March 19th, 2015, 08:20am
Always do it. Thanks for the compliment physk.

You should do it in racecar. Saves tranny and diff of hard shocks. And makes things so smooth.

SpidermanGeek
March 19th, 2015, 08:21am
ya FWIW I do it instinctively whenever driving manual now.. Sort of strange, became a habit

I've managed to somewhat do it in the Sunfire. I think the pedal placement is more conducive to it, but forget it in the Matrix. It's a little weird with the Drive-By-Wire throttle too.

luker
March 19th, 2015, 08:22am
I always heel toe on track and almost never on the street. I brake very very light on the street and don't get the brake pedal deep enough to roll on the throttle. Most of the time.

Mario
March 19th, 2015, 08:24am
What Luker said. It's much more difficult when lightly braking then going all the way down

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 08:25am
Brake harder. It is better for the brakes. Get them up to temp. ;)

SpidermanGeek
March 19th, 2015, 08:27am
I always heel toe on track and almost never on the street. I brake very very light on the street and don't get the brake pedal deep enough to roll on the throttle. Most of the time.

Valid point. I let the engine do most of the work most of the time. Basically just using the brake pedal to activate the brake lights. It might explain why when I changed my rotors and pads at 100,000 kms, they were only half-worn. lol.

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 08:31am
Brakes are much cheaper than a clutch.

luker
March 19th, 2015, 08:33am
Passengers don't like slamming their heads into the dash when you over braked. That's why I have a race car, I leave the hooligan driving on the track.

Andre
March 19th, 2015, 08:34am
What Luker said. It's much more difficult when lightly braking then going all the way down

Lol can't remember who's car I was driving but it was pretty recently.. Just about ate the steering wheel coming up to a light.

Ooops too much brake

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 08:34am
Passengers don't like slamming their heads into the dash when you over braked. That's why I have a race car, I leave the hooligan driving on the track.

It's a car, not your living room couch mister driving 160 in a Subruban.

snail
March 19th, 2015, 08:47am
Damn you G25/G27 users!

i`ll sell mine.

tellum
March 19th, 2015, 08:56am
Also did it like Greg explained. Having good shoes made this even easier.

If I could do it in a Miata with my size 12, anyone should be able to. My BRZ was so easy, pedals were very nicely placed for this stock

29384

My size 13's worked in the Miata... had to bend the gas pedal a bit to make everything fit though. ;)

Pete
March 19th, 2015, 08:58am
My size 13's worked in the Miata... had to bend the gas pedal a bit to make everything fit though. ;)

That was also key. I dont remember what way I bent it but it helped.

Back then they made them pedals out of metal too, not plastic.

luker
March 19th, 2015, 09:16am
It's a car, not your living room couch mister driving 160 in a Subruban.

Have no idea what you are talking about.

sb_915
March 19th, 2015, 09:19am
I struggled trying to do that with the ball of my foot on the brake pedal and couldn't reach properly. Works better with my 'toe' on the brake pedal and just lean the side of the foot onto the gas.


I've always done it how Greg explains it. Not so much in my automatic, but hey it rev matches for me on downshift.


This.

When I was struggling to make more time, forced myself to learn it, made me smoother and faster. Ended up being more of a foot roll.


Also did it like Greg explained. Having good shoes made this even easier.

If I could do it in a Miata with my size 12, anyone should be able to. My BRZ was so easy, pedals were very nicely placed for this stock

29384


I use the Greg technique. Modified the pedal in the Miata to make it work, the Mini is just about perfect as is.

I still can't left foot brake effectively. It's what separates the fast kids from the mid-pack in Formula Vee.

^This. It's SO easy in a BMW - the pedal position is perfect. should be a nice easy roll of the foot, keep your toe on the brake.


Don't do it much on the street, typically only 3-2 shift.

shlammed
March 19th, 2015, 09:19am
I rev match on the street. no real need to heel toe driving around. I can take almost all urban road corners at traffic speed if i really wanted to.

There isnt much braking involved street driving the MINI.



When i was tracking I would heel/toe. when i was into drifting heel/toe really didnt do much, but you would left foot brake a lot, even while under power.


When I did it in the s13/miata I would have almost the middle of my foot on the brake -just under the ball- and actually rotate my leg to press my heel on the gas. Is that why my ankle clicks like a mofo now?

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 09:20am
I find it really helps to always do it. After a while, you don't even have to think about it, it just happens naturally.

condor888000
March 19th, 2015, 09:31am
Agreed. I stated off doing it at every gear change. Now I don't even think about it, just happens. Becomes muscle memory.

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 09:32am
Yeah the BMW pedals are setup well for the toe roll. The racecar not so much. May have to look at moving the pedals around a bit.

This got me curious, so I looked at some of the data from the racecar last year. The car never felt upset when downshifting (except into beak the odd time) but you can clearly see it did affect the wheel speed when downshifting. But comparing it to upshifts, its really not that bad. Anyone else have any data theyd like to share?

wing
March 19th, 2015, 09:36am
If I'm reading that graph right, you are going too slow in 6/7 :P

I might have data would have to check the laptop

shlammed
March 19th, 2015, 09:36am
whats the x scale axis there? seconds?

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 09:41am
whats the x scale axis there? seconds?
Excel Data lines...forgot to change that to seconds. Data is logged at 10 times per second so those numbers are tenths

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 09:45am
If I'm reading that graph right, you are going too slow in 6/7 :P

I might have data would have to check the laptop

Always gotta be one smartass in the group eh????

mikeman
March 19th, 2015, 09:48am
I do it all the time, even when not "HOOOONING".. I remember learning how many moons ago after watching rally videos, now it's habit.

shlammed
March 19th, 2015, 09:48am
Just flat pedal the clutch and the gas, then side step the clutch.

Fuck brakes.

shlammed
March 19th, 2015, 09:51am
http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i136/maattt/IMG_2981.jpg (http://s71.photobucket.com/user/maattt/media/IMG_2981.jpg.html)

FPOS
March 19th, 2015, 10:00am
i'll double clutch but I haven't figured out heel-toe. something tells me the new clutch is going to be a little less forgiving than the OEM stuff I've been using to this point though. I'm probably gonna hafta learn.....

shlammed
March 19th, 2015, 10:02am
I drove my buddys rhd soarer last year and it has a 6 puck unsprung clutch with a mechanical LSD and subframe bushing collars. it doesnt rev up the same with inputs as my car does and I was having a real hard time getting the shifts right. you know when it clicks.

It just takes a while to learn, but you will get it.



Dont bother double clutching? idk if your serious. we dont drive 1930's army trucks.

mightymousetech
March 19th, 2015, 10:05am
Dont bother double clutching? idk if your serious. we dont drive 1930's army trucks.

Ya, was wondering about everybody doing this. They have invented this thing called syncros.

Pete
March 19th, 2015, 10:08am
Ya, was wondering about everybody doing this. They have invented this thing called syncros.

It was brought back in fashion in the 90s with the JDM B16 and B18 swaps in civics that grinded 2-3-4 most of the time.

JLats83
March 19th, 2015, 10:10am
Torretto told me too.

dwarrick
March 19th, 2015, 10:11am
I learned to do it at the track then started doing it on the street.

I do it the "opposite" of most at use my heel for gas, top of foot for brake. I had a hard time doing it the other way.

It did make a difference in lap times and life of parts probably

mikeman
March 19th, 2015, 10:16am
Ya, was wondering about everybody doing this. They have invented this thing called syncros.

you need to double clutch in a highway tractor because it doesn't have synchros
except it has straight cut gears
so you can just rev match instead
so you don't need to double clutch

sb_915
March 19th, 2015, 11:07am
only time i double clutched was going into 5th in the chumpcar, because the synchros were fubarred. then the tranny was fubarred so that problem fixed itself, really.

runwhatyabrung
March 19th, 2015, 11:25am
had a hard time doing it in the Miata until I installed a gas pedal extender (still have it if anyone want's it) Now with the 370Z and rev-match, I look like a champ even though I have 2 left feet

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 11:39am
Found this a good read. NOTE that this is for sequential NON-syncromesh boxes. Like the Bike engine in our car. It explains why I don't need to "blip" when down shifting and braking. Gonna have to try the "Load,Lift,Shift" upshifts this year.

Methods of Changing Gear.

By William Hewland.

The following is some info regarding shifting gear and face dog wear. I am in the fortunate position where I have a good amount of knowledge on the subject, as I understand the mechanical side and the user (driver) side equally well.

N.B. For succesful gear shifting, remember that it is critical to ensure that all mechanical elements between the drivers hand and the dog faces are in good order and properly set. This includes the gear linkage in the chassis!

Successful up-shifting, (defined as fast and non dog-damaging) will be achieved by fully moving the dog ring as rapidly as possible from one gear to the next, preferably with the engine's driving load removed until the shift is completed. (The opposite is true of a synchromesh gearbox as used in passenger cars, where slow movement helps). It should be remembered that it is not possible to damage the dogs when fully engaged (in gear). The damage can only take place when initiating contact during a shift, (the `danger zone`) therefore this element must be made as short as possible. If a driver moves the gear lever slowly, or if the linkage is not rigid and effective, dog wear will occur. We always recommend lightweight yet solid rod linkage, not cables ideally.

I list below the different methods of up-shifting that are used in racing most commonly. The best at the top, the worst at the bottom:

Automated (semi automated). The movement of the dog ring is powered and the engine is cut / re-instated in a co-ordinated manner. Gear-shifts take milliseconds. This system produces zero dog wear when set up well. It is not applicable to most cars, but it illustrates that speed of shift is a good thing.

Manual with engine cut. This system is almost as good as an automated one as long as the driver pulls the lever very quickly. Again it is not applicable to many cars, but it illustrates that speed of shift is a good thing. A `cheat` version of this is to shift on the engine rev limiter, which can work well. With this system it is especially important to move the lever ultra fast, otherwise the engine will be reinstated during partial dog engagement, causing damage. The damage can usually be felt by the driver.

Manual.
Best method: With no assistance from the engine management, the driver must lift off the throttle sufficiently to allow the dog ring to be pulled out of engagement. He should then stay off the throttle long enough to allow the dog ring to engage with the next gear. In practice, the driver can move the gear lever faster than he can move his foot off and back on to the throttle. Therefore the effective method is to apply load to the gear lever with your hand and then lift the throttle foot off and back on to the pedal as fast as physically possible. In lifting your foot, the loaded gear lever will almost involuntarily flick to the next gear before the foot is re-applied to the throttle.

Another method is to load the gear lever with your hand, stay flat on the throttle and dab the clutch to release the dog ring. The overall effect on the gear shift is similar to the above method, but clutch wear may become a big issue.

The worst method (most destructive and definitely slowest) is to attempt to change gear in a `passenger car / synchromesh` way, i.e. lifting off the throttle, dipping the clutch, moving the gear lever, letting the clutch up and re-instating the throttle. The method causes unnecessary clutch wear, does absolutely nothing to help come out of gear and usually causes dog wear whilst engaging the next gear. This wear is due to several reasons. Firstly, it is impossible for a driver to co-ordinate the complicated sequence of all five physical movements accurately. Consequently the engagement dogs often find themselves engaging whilst the throttle is applied. The lever is usually pulled more slowly as it was not pre-loaded, lengthening the `danger zone`.

Successful down-shifting, has similar rules applied regarding speed of shift. Unloading the dogs is done in the opposite manner obviously. Whilst braking, the dogs must be unloaded by either touching the throttle pedal or- my preferred method- by dipping the clutch. However, one sharp dab of clutch or throttle is appropriate per shift. Continued pressure on either will cause dog damage for different reasons. `Blipping the throttle` just before engagement is advisable if the rev drops between gears are over 1300 rpm, as this will aid engagement and stabilise the car.

TOP TIP for ease of downshifting: Make the downshifts as late as possible in your braking zone (i.e. at lower road speed), because the rev drops between each gear are then lower. So many drivers make the mistake of downshifting as soon as they begin braking, causing gearbox wear, engine damage and `disruption` to the driving wheels.

This is a subject which can be much expanded on, but I feel that these are the basics, which I hope are of use.

William Hewland,
President, Hewland Engineering.

wing
March 19th, 2015, 11:45am
Sounds exactly how Matt explained it to me when I bought the radical so that's how I did it.

I would hold the lever with a little pressure full throttle, then lift foot, lever goes back and falls into gear and foot goes back down. Happens really fast.

On downshift would blip and stab at clutch just a little not fully disengage and it slips in.

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 11:54am
This is definitely going onto the new car.
http://flatshifter.com/flatshifter-expert/

wing
March 19th, 2015, 11:55am
Talk to Bill Olders, I think he has one for sale.

figo
March 19th, 2015, 12:29pm
I can brake with half my toes and foot and roll or pivot my foot to hit the throttle, only with certain shoes (size 13). I don't have any room to move my legs in my car and I'm seated improperly, but a blast to drive lol

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 12:58pm
Talk to Bill Olders, I think he has one for sale.

is he "Ottawaracer" on Apex? If so, the flatshift sold in like 10 minutes. He lists some stuff pretty cheap, but it usually sells in record time and I miss it.

wing
March 19th, 2015, 01:02pm
No I think Ottawaracer is Keith Carter

I don't think Bill is on apex speed. He's the guy with the red radical.

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 01:05pm
OK I know who Bill is. I'll check with him on the 25th. Honestly I don't really need it anytime soon, but it may be worth it if its a good deal. Maybe Install in the Legend???? HMMM

mikeman
March 19th, 2015, 01:49pm
`Blipping the throttle` just before engagement is advisable if the rev drops between gears are over 1300 rpm, as this will aid engagement and stabilise the car.

raggedrabbit
March 19th, 2015, 02:29pm
I learned to heel toe in my little diesel Rabbit, the poor thing weighed 2000 lbs and had a +65 lbs. rotating assembly, a tight ratio gearbox, a redline at ~5k RPM (maybe 60hp?) and made no power below 3k RPM. You had to go in screaming, crush the brakes, get the mill going and be on power before apex or the ass end would start to float.

It's pretty easy heel toeing with the lightweight GTi motor now. I heel/toe in my Ranger as well, and have no trouble doing so, in loafers, sandles, or work boots (the most interesting, with thick, hard soles). The best shift are ones you can't see or feel.

I put the ball of my foot into the brakes and roll onto the gas, sometimes by rotating my foot/heel counter-clockwise to get more into it. Just like left foot braking, I think it's important to practice in a controlled slow environment (on the street... when no one is in front of you lol) so that you can do it right and repeat-ably. You don't have to drive crazy to do it, it can be done casually without notice of passengers.

raggedrabbit
March 19th, 2015, 02:32pm
Here is a video I made, I think it's from two years ago. I was trying to get a feel for how well I was shifting so I cut out the parts where you can see my feet a bit and have the hardest shifts. This is that video.


https://vimeo.com/85227076

raggedrabbit
March 19th, 2015, 02:51pm
OP, none of that is useful to you with your dog box though.

Do guys have trouble with the dogs wearing under the extra load/heavier vehicles? I've changed dogs on an old Yamaha 600, they certainly don't last forever (all the more reason to shift nice).

GIF-PWR
March 19th, 2015, 03:30pm
I think I've heard it refered to as Toe/Toe? ...and yes same, both Mini and Z06 I couldn't figure out how to place foot for heel/toe so did foot-rolly toe/toe thing

it's heel-toe if you have size 5 shoes.

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 03:39pm
OP, none of that is useful to you with your dog box though.

Do guys have trouble with the dogs wearing under the extra load/heavier vehicles? I've changed dogs on an old Yamaha 600, they certainly don't last forever (all the more reason to shift nice).

Its more for the 323 I'm learning the "blipping"

The only major issues we've had with the motor have been transmission related but not really due to the weight of the car. We do rag on it pretty hard tho.

We bought the car from a guy that drag raced it. The first year we did lose a clutch, but we have no idea how long the guy drag raced it and if he was easy on it or not. We actually had a new one on hand because we had suspected it. Changed it in under an hour at a lapping day at Shannonville. The new clutch has virtually zero wear after 2 years.

At the last Libre race last year we took the transmission out of the car. A snap-ring that holds the 4th gear output shaft in let go and munched 3 gears. After investigation it looks like it was a tolerance issue and is fairly common. Not related to anything we did or how we drive the car. The dogs, forks and drum all appear in very good shape.

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 03:41pm
`Blipping the throttle` just before engagement is advisable if the rev drops between gears are over 1300 rpm, as this will aid engagement and stabilise the car.


Looking at my data, it normally drops around 1000rpm. I am going to wait until further into the braking zone to downshift now tho. The only time I notice that it upsets the car is into beak and its the only place on the track that I shift into 2nd. The ratio difference between 2nd and 3rd is pretty big and I forget this sometimes and downshift a little early.

raggedrabbit
March 19th, 2015, 04:32pm
Its more for the 323 I'm learning the "blipping"

The only major issues we've had with the motor have been transmission related but not really due to the weight of the car. We do rag on it pretty hard tho.

We bought the car from a guy that drag raced it. The first year we did lose a clutch, but we have no idea how long the guy drag raced it and if he was easy on it or not. We actually had a new one on hand because we had suspected it. Changed it in under an hour at a lapping day at Shannonville. The new clutch has virtually zero wear after 2 years.

At the last Libre race last year we took the transmission out of the car. A snap-ring that holds the 4th gear output shaft in let go and munched 3 gears. After investigation it looks like it was a tolerance issue and is fairly common. Not related to anything we did or how we drive the car. The dogs, forks and drum all appear in very good shape.

All this makes me *really* want one of those little cars. Awesome.

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 05:14pm
You can get the one that's forsale on the bogie website for 5k. My dad drove it last year the night ours broke and its pleanty quick. I think he ran a 2:32 with it that night

mikeman
March 19th, 2015, 06:07pm
Get a 'slipper' clutch ;)

And the Quick Shifter.

No lift shifts on the way up and it'll never get upset on the way down. Blipping be damned.

I love bike drivetrains...

petawawarace
March 19th, 2015, 06:25pm
Get a 'slipper' clutch ;)

And the Quick Shifter.

No lift shifts on the way up and it'll never get upset on the way down. Blipping be damned.

I love bike drivetrains...

that flatshift kit includes an auto blipper. Sense the downshift and automatically blips the throttle.

dbg
March 19th, 2015, 07:08pm
My only complaint about "heel and toe" is the name. It's not descriptive of what 99% of people actually do. (I do it the way Greg does.)

Veyronkiller
March 19th, 2015, 08:05pm
http://easyauctiontools.net/images/heeltoe.jpg

mikeman
March 19th, 2015, 08:59pm
that flatshift kit includes an auto blipper. Sense the downshift and automatically blips the throttle.

Ya that's neat too. I like the slippers

ZOO
March 23rd, 2015, 08:45pm
I do it. Every time. On track. On the street. It is all about smoothness and practice. Think of it more as left side and right side of your foot . . .

EvilDeadFan
March 24th, 2015, 04:06pm
I can only heel toe barefoot or wearing socks. Otherwise any kind of big shoe (size 13) ends up getting uncomfortably close to the dash wiring.

raggedrabbit
March 24th, 2015, 04:33pm
I can only heel toe barefoot or wearing socks. Otherwise any kind of big shoe (size 13) ends up getting uncomfortably close to the dash wiring.

buy some zip-ties?

Jon.0
March 24th, 2015, 06:33pm
I can only heel toe barefoot or wearing socks. Otherwise any kind of big shoe (size 13) ends up getting uncomfortably close to the dash wiring.
Your foot is between the 2 pedals. Why are you encountering wiring there? If it's above, it wouldn't make a difference if you're heel/toeing or not.

Mouser
March 24th, 2015, 06:39pm
I often wondered how the heal toe compares to the NLTS(No lift to shift) functions out there. Essentially setting the engine to a specific rpm on shift. I have the NLTS function on the Talon but haven't tried it yet.

wing
March 24th, 2015, 06:45pm
No lift downshift???

pyxen
March 24th, 2015, 07:10pm
Unpossible.

Got me a fancy loud pedal for my miater thanks to Luc. For more heel/toe!

Mouser
March 24th, 2015, 07:31pm
After doing more homework on it the NLTS is mainly for up shifting and not down. It's like a rpm limiter for when the clutch is depressed to keep the engine up to speed, keep the turbo spooling and gears closer to speed. So doesn't work for downshifting, unless you keep your foot pegged on the throttle the whole time. Learn something every day.
Heal toe it is...

tellum
March 24th, 2015, 08:41pm
I used NLTS in the SRT-4. Was awesome for banging gears.

snail
March 25th, 2015, 08:31am
bwaaaaaaa. popop bwaaaaaaaaaaaa